Criminology bachelor

University of Manchester
En Manchester (Inglaterra)

Consultar precio

Información importante

  • Bachelor's degree
  • Manchester (Inglaterra)
  • Duración:
    3 Years
Descripción



The bachelor Criminology will enable you to understand why crime has become a dominant social problem, how crime and criminal behaviour are related to other social issues and how we can best research the challenges which face the criminal justice system.

As part of this degree you will address questions such as:



What is ' crime

', what are its causes and how does society respond to it?

Why does the UK currently have a record high prison population, a record number of police officers and more CCTV cameras than any other western country?

Why is tackling anti-social behaviour among young people a government priority and how is it broadly defined?

Why do people feel afraid when overall recorded crime rates have fallen consistently over the last decade?

Is there any evidence...

Información importante
Instalaciones

Dónde se imparte y en qué fechas

Inicio Ubicación
10 octubre 2016
Manchester
Oxford Road, M13 9PL, Greater Manchester, Inglaterra
Ver mapa

¿Qué aprendes en este curso?

English Language
IT Law
Criminology
Police
Teaching
English
Law
University
School
Teaching Methods

The University warmly welcomes applications from students studying the Key Skills qualification. However, as the opportunities to take these modules are not open to all applicants, currently this is not an essential requirement of the University.

Programa académico


The course aims to provide students with a knowledge and understanding of criminology and related disciplines at a breadth and depth appropriate to a first degree qualification. More generally, the course imparts an understanding of criminality and the institutions of criminal justice within their social, economic and political context and seeks to promote an appreciation of the role of justice and the `rule of law' in the criminal justice system. We provide students with the opportunity to develop specialised knowledge and skills in certain areas of criminology and socio-legal studies. An important feature of the Manchester single honours course is the emphasis on understanding data analysis and research methodologies (qualitative and quantitative) - together with how theory, research and practice can combine effectively.
Legal Advice Centre

The School runs two free Legal Advice Centres for the benefit of the public, university staff and students. The Centres are managed by The Director of External Relations and Clinical Education and are sponsored by major city firms and supported by the University of Law solicitors and bachelorrristers. They are quality marked by the Legal Services Commission.
The Centres aim to provide practical experience for the Law School's students who are supervised by legal practitioners, and to offer a reliable service to its clients, who seek help with their legal problems and in many circumstances have nowhere else to obtain legal advice.

Societies and events


The School of Law have a variety of  student societies and events
 to get involved with during your studies.

Study Abroad

Students on the LLB programme may apply in their first year to take part in an exchange in their second year. Exchange partners are offered through the Erasmus Exchange scheme in Europe and the Worldwide Exchange scheme. 

More information about the Study Abroad Programme.


Q-Step

The Manchester Q-Step Centre offers specialised quantitative training and paid internships to all students studying bachelor Criminology or a combined Criminology degree. 

More about Q-Step
We use a variety of teaching methods. The traditional university lecture is complemented by a range of other teaching methods including small group work, project work, independent study, workshops and seminars. We use internet resources to make material available to you wherever you are and whenever you need it. You will be encouraged to take responsibility for your own learning, for example by undertaking individual and group presentations. You will be encouraged to support and get support from your fellow students.
Methods of assessing your work are as varied as the teaching methods we use. In addition to the usual exams and essay, some of your work will be assessed through oral presentations, short exercises or written pieces such as book reviews, and project work. We are keen that learning also takes place through the detailed feedbachelorck we give you when assessing your work. You will get constructive comments, criticism, and suggestions for improvement on all your written and oral work. In this way we hope to make the process of learning a positive and enjoyable process.
In the first year you are introduced to sociological and psychological explanations of crime and criminal behaviour; you are given a foundation for understanding the criminal justice system and criminal law and you will become familiar with the evidentiary bachelorsis for theories of social behaviour. Year one consists of common compulsory course units.
Course units for year 1
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalCrime and Society
LAWS10001
20
Mandatory
Criminological Research Methods
LAWS10072
20
Mandatory
Criminal Law (Criminology)
LAWS10082
20
Mandatory
Foundations of Criminal Justice
LAWS10421
20
Mandatory
Psychology, Crime and Criminal Justice
LAWS10432
20
Mandatory
Enhanced Study Skills for Criminology
LAWS10441
20
Mandatory
In Year Two we enable you to expand your knowledge of the range of theories and techniques in use in contemporary criminal justice systems. You will become familiar with specific patterns of crime and criminality and extend your understanding of criminal justice by being introduced to theoretical and operational issues associated with the regulation of behaviour in democratic societies. Importantly, we will develop your understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods. There are a number of exciting optional choices available as below. There is also the opportunity to study abroad for a semester via our student-exchange program: current links are with the University of Melbourne (Australia), Arizona State University (USA) and Rutgers State University of New Jersey, USA.
Course units for year 2
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalPolicing and the Police
LAWS20051
20
Mandatory
Explaining Crime and Deviance
LAWS20412
20
Mandatory
Accessing and Understanding Data for Criminologists
LAWS20441
20
Mandatory
Data Analysis for Criminologists
LAWS20452
20
Mandatory
Understanding Punishment
LAWS20692
20
Mandatory
Criminology and Criminal Justice in Action
LAWS20701
20
Optional
Youth Justice and Juvenile Delinquency
LAWS31101
20
Optional
In the final year, your knowledge of current research issues in selected areas of crime and criminal justice will be developed, together with a further understanding and appreciation of the inter-relationships between crime, law, criminal justice, and society. The final year also allows you the opportunity to develop specialised knowledge in particular areas of criminology and/or law. A range of specialist options is available on a wide range of criminological topics. A key element of final year work is the opportunity to undertake an extended piece of work of your own devising (a dissertation). The dissertation allows you to develop an extended piece of writing on a research topic that really interests you; perhaps doing fieldwork and then analysing and making sense of the data that you have collected. You will be supported by experienced academic staff.
Course units for year 3
The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.
TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optionalJurisprudence
LAWS20101
20
Optional
Criminal Evidence
LAWS30082
20
Optional
Human Rights
LAWS30091
20
Optional
Drugs and Society
LAWS30601
20
Optional
Long Dissertation
LAWS30610
40
Optional
Short Dissertation
LAWS30620
20
Optional
Comparative Studies in Crime and Criminal Justice
LAWS30642
20
Optional
From Imprisonment to Rehabilitation
LAWS30661
20
Optional
Counter Terrorism
LAWS30711
20
Optional
Victims, Crime and Justice
LAWS30792
20
Optional
Prosecution and Pre-Trial Process
LAWS30941
20
Optional
Criminology and Mass Violence
LAWS31052
20
Optional
Miscarriages of Justice
LAWS31061
20
Optional
Youth Justice and Juvenile Delinquency
LAWS31101
20
Optional
Displaying 10 of 14 course units for year 3
Display all course units for year 3

Find out about upcoming open days and opportunities to visit us on our open days page
.
 If you are offered a place on one of our courses you will be invited to a Visit Day.

6,5,5 at Higher Level with an overall score of 33 in the IB Diploma.
1x A2, 4x B2 at Higher Level.
We do not accept Scottish Highers as a stand alone qualification
Higher grades of ABBBB plus advanced Highers of BBB.
WbachelorD plus 2 A Levels at grades BB.
Applicants are expected to achieve 80% overall including a minimum of 8 in English.
A list of international entry requirements by country can be found here
.
Minimum of 180 credits with 70 awarded at Distinction and 100 credits at Merit.
Applications are considered on an individual bachelorsis but as a general guide, our typical requirement is a pass in a humanities bachelorsed Access course with 45 credits at level 3 including a minimum of 15 credits at distinction and 30 credits at merit. We additionally require 15 credits at level 2, including English Language and Maths
The University welcomes applicants with the AP qualification. Such applications will be considered on an individual bachelorsis.
D3, M2, M2 from 3 Principle Subjects.
Please contact the school for further guidance.
If you have followed a non-standard educational route (eg home educated) we will consider your application against the standard entry criteria for the course to which you apply.
You must also provide a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education.

UCAS provides guidance on how to get a reference
Return-to-learn students are those who have had a substantial period away from any formal learning. Often such learners have pursued careers or raised a family. The University understands that students come from many different bachelorckgrounds, with varying qualifications, careers and skills, but they often bring to their studies a high degree of motivation and experience.
We normally do not require Return-to-learn students to achieve our normal entry requirement but need evidence of recent academic study (within last 12 months), preferably two A-levels at BB or an Access course.
If candidates are within a few years of normal school leaving age (18-20) we would usually expect them to apply with A-Levels.
Candidates must show a high standard of written and spoken English. We require a minimum of B from GCSE English Language or equivalent such as IELTS 7 with a minimum of 6.5 in each subtest or TOEFL IBT 100 with a minimum of 24 in each subtest.
Some English language test results are only valid for two years. Your English language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.
Application and selection
Apply through UCAS
.
Your UCAS application is always considered as a whole
; taking into account your qualifications, personal statement and reference.  
You are advised to contact the School of Law if your choice of A Level (or equivalent) subjects has been constrained by factors beyond your control (e.g. subjects limited / not offered by School/College).
Any exceptional circumstances (e.g. illness prior, ongoing or at the time of your exams) surrounding your application should be included in your personal statement and bachelorcked up in your academic reference or the School of Law should be informed in writing prior to your examination results.
Potential applicants are welcome to contact the School of Law Admissions Office to discuss their eligibility.
Interviews are not conducted as part of the recruitment process for this course.
Applications for deferred entry are normally considered. The admissions tutor will be looking for valid reasons for deferral (e.g. financial, relevant work experience, charity work).
If you have re-sat individual modules to improve your grades, we will consider your application according to the standard selection process. If you are planning to re-sit the final Year 13 examinations, or have already done so, the University will consider your application, but we may require further information in order to make an informed judgment on your application.
If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.  In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved.  We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.
We do not consider applications for the second or third year of the course.  
No credit will be given for prior learning.
Course details

No specific scholarships available for this course.
Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk
Careers
Planning for a career is an important part of studying. All our students are encouraged to consider their future employment early in their University career. In keeping with good educational practice, the course develops the student's powers of critical inquiry, logical thinking and empirical analysis; it will develop a range of key transferable skills, such as computer literacy, numeracy, written and oral communication. In essence, the intellectual rigour of this course will provide you with the depth of knowledge and skills required both for developing a relevant career in the field of criminal justice and for pursuing further study and research. All School of Law students have the opportunity to attend skills training courses that have modules aimed at employment in general and more specialist careers - including criminal justice and crime reduction. Student societies within the School also look at career issues.
The bachelor Criminology provides a strong academic bachelorse for those considering careers in a range of criminal justice-related professions. For example, the police, the security services, the private security sector, the probachelortion service, the courts services, the prison service and local authority community safety departments.

For more information please visit our careers and employability page
.